Blitz Scenario Based Interview Questions

August 10, 2007 at 2:19 am 1 comment

Scenario-based interviewing is a frequently used tool, so you should be prepared. Simply by utilising CAR you will impress the interviewer with your clear, insightful answers when you are presented with the: “Name a situation when…” questions.

In my resume questionnaire I encourage my clients to use CAR (Challenge / Action / Result) as the basis to drawing out past achievements: a truly powerful method in preparing a dynamic resume and to boost your personal interview preparation.

Prior to the interview go over your achievements on paper first. Depending on your vocation and your seniority you may be asked questions such as:

  •  “Give a specific situation when you used logic to solve a difficulty.”
  • “Give an example of the strategies you used to turn around falling sales.”
  • “Tell me about an actual incident with a difficult customer and what you did to achieve a win-win situation.”

Utilise CAR when writing down your answers (you should already have done this for your resume but if you haven’t NOW is the time to prepare).

For example, your written answers could be formatted like this:

Challenge:

When I commenced in that role I inherited a team that was fragmented by lack of motivation. This had resulted in low morale, severely reduced productivity and poor client relations.

Action:

I assessed the work environment and implemented a more open style of management, which ensured ease of access to me, also I assured team members of my openness to give guidance and advice. I encouraged employee ownership by allowing decision-making powers where appropriate and consolidated an impressive range of team experience and expertise.

Result:

We achieved an outstanding turnaround resulting in a team that demonstrated a strong, committed work ethic in an harmonious and productive environment with the ability to consistently meet all deadlines. There was also a remarkable improvement in the level of communications between team members and clients.

Then, should you be asked the question: “Tell us about a time when you improved productivity”, your verbal answer at the interview will then sound something like this:

“Yes, I can give you a good example of that. When I commenced in my last position, I inherited a team that was fragmented by lack of motivation. This had resulted in low morale, severely reduced productivity and poor client relations.

I saw that resolving this situation needed to be my first priority so I assessed the work environment and implemented a more open style of management, which ensured ease of access to me. Also, I assured team members of my openness to give guidance and advice. I encouraged employee ownership by allowing decision-making powers where appropriate and consolidated an impressive range of team experience and expertise.

I’m pleased to say that we achieved an outstanding turnaround resulting in a team that demonstrated a strong, committed work ethic in an harmonious and productive environment and with the ability to consistently meet all deadlines. There was also a remarkable improvement in the level of communications between team members and clients.”

Now you have your potential answers in place practice in your mind then out loud in front of the mirror until your answers are smooth and natural. When you have practiced often enough, even if you are not asked your practice questions, your mind will be programmed to retrieve the relevant information in a cohesive form.

Then, at the interview, when asked a scenario-based question, you can relax – you have it all at your fingertips.

Advertisements

Entry filed under: Uncategorized.

Can You Take It Easy In Today’s Employment Market

1 Comment Add your own

  • 1. Mr WordPress  |  August 10, 2007 at 2:19 am

    Hi, this is a comment.
    To delete a comment, just log in, and view the posts’ comments, there you will have the option to edit or delete them.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Trackback this post  |  Subscribe to the comments via RSS Feed


Categories

Recent Posts


%d bloggers like this: